Category Archives: Fictional Musings

July 15

Symington Byrd 2… an update

Byrd’s latest mystery is proving a bit of a bugger. (Excuse my French). The corpses are piling up nicely. The murderer has motive and opportunity. Everybody who was at Hamblebee Hall (court, house – I’ll make my mind up by the end of the book) on the night of the murder is lying, and their […]

Byrd Speaks

Fellow KGHH author  C.A (Christine) Ardron has been put forward for the Sunshine Blogger Award by Debbie. A cunning little wheeze in which a single character from a book has to answer  questions on their author. At the end of the interview (which you can read here) she nominated me. (Cheers! Thanks! This is harder […]

Burning question

Six people give an account of a dinner party. One member of the party doesn’t mention one of the guests at all during his account. Why not?

July 25

Emily: A Metamorphosis

I have been having a look at this blog in the last few days, making a few changes here – tweaking there; preparing for the summmer when I can blog and post to my heart’s content. Doing so, I came across an old post – It’s all in the clothes. This post contained my initial […]

December 31

A Dilemma

First let me explain, I have not been posting because I have been writing. I have in the last week written 10,500 words explaining what has happened to Lucy since the end of book two. And some of those words seem to be making sense. But this new spurt of activity has caused a problem. […]

April 12

It’s all in the Clothes

OH and I have been thinking a lot about Emily and her relationship with Symington. She’s an East End girl of genteel stock; he was part of the late King Edward’s crowd. . He has been asked to look after her, she has contacts in the East End that are vital to a criminologist; but […]

October 20

Phyllis Pearsall: Plot saver…

As an historian, I usually don’t have a lot of time for geography. It’s professional pride. We’re at opposite ends of the humanities – and like daleks and cybermen, historians and geographers are fundamentally different. One is a noble exponent of detection, the other a mere scientist. but for Phyllis Pearsall, I am prepared to […]